SDC Talk!
SDC Talk!
Home | Profile | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 General Discussion
 General Discussion
 Keeping Wolves away
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 2

smushybanana

USA
562 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2007 :  11:05:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit smushybanana's Homepage  Reply with Quote
So, this year is a terrible year for wolves in the Fairbanks area. Several dogs already have been killed/eaten in dog yards this winter. Fish&Game is looking for information from anyone who has any experience keeping them away. So far the only thing known to work is a fenced dog yard. Does anyone else here have personal experience with this? Suggestions for things that work?

My yard personally is fenced, but we are compiling information for an article to help the mushing community in Fairbanks. Thanks.

Hilary Schwafel

Razor

Canada
807 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2007 :  04:06:25 AM  Show Profile  Visit Razor's Homepage  Reply with Quote
This is going to sound stupid but it works. Where we live in Ontario there is a large pack that lives in the vacinity, Our neighbours who raise emu's and Ostrich were having problems with them. They aquired a Donkey, which apparently make excellent watch dogs and are very tenacious about chasing wolves off. Something to look into if it's a problem in your dog yard. Good Luck

Razor

Razor
Go to Top of Page

Cliff Maxfield

USA
2631 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2007 :  06:58:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I remember a Wayne Hall post on another site about human urine. Collect it and place a buffer zone between what your trying to protect and the wolves. It's an old anti trapping trick.
Go to Top of Page

swanny

USA
869 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2007 :  08:33:49 AM  Show Profile  Visit swanny's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Well, since we are already feeding dogs anyway, why not bring in a livestock guardian dog such as an Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Bernese Mountain Dog, &c? You want a dog from working lines - best result will be to start with a pup and socialize the pup primarily to the dogs in the kennel. They are genetically "hard wired" to protect the animals (or humans) they grow up with.

One of my big sled dogs is an Anatolian / alaskan husky mix adopted from the shelter as a puppy. Although I was very careful to socilaize him to people to the greatest extent possible Seamus has displayed plenty of willingness to guard the team, "his" dog truck, and "his" harness and "his" master from intruders - along with some other traits common to the breed. I have to be very careful that only handlers he knows and is familiar with try to harness or unharness him. He is also a very willing and hard working sled dog so provides the best of both breeds. I doubt someone could have bred that combination on purpose.

Just a caveat - they WILL guard against strange humans as well as wild or domesticated animal predators - and some guardian breeds were selected to not give much warning. That's great if you want a watchdog, but not so great if neighbors kids or pet dogs have a tendancy to prowl around your yard.

I think both the donkey and urine marking ideas have a lot of merit. Personally I'll avoid the donkey. One jacka** at my house is enough and I'm doing fine without the competition. Ultimately, I think the best solution really is a perimeter fence around your kennel, especially if your neighbor's kennel isn't fenced.

Swanny

A good dog is so much a nobler beast than an indifferent man that one sometimes gladly exchanges the society of one for that of the other. William Francis Butler

http://www.tworiversak.com/mushing.htm

Edited by - swanny on 11/30/2007 08:37:49 AM
Go to Top of Page

bluesharpplayer

USA
214 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2007 :  10:38:24 AM  Show Profile  Visit bluesharpplayer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Just a side note on the urine idea. I heard it was only human male urine that works - female's urine doesn't have enough testosterone in it to ward off wolves. Don't know if this is true or not - just somwthing to consider.

If your not having fun, you need to consider what you're doing wrong.
Go to Top of Page

Razor

Canada
807 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2007 :  11:28:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit Razor's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Yeah, but Swanny do you chase Wolves.LOL

Razor

Razor
Go to Top of Page

THZSteele

USA
1081 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2007 :  11:46:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit THZSteele's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I saw something on TV once about playing a recording of wolves howling...this Biologist theroized(sp?) that he could keep wolves away by laying recored defensivehowls of another pack...he actually used recording form a captive pack he was rasiing and played those recordings at place where wolves have been a problem with taking down livestock and such...i think he even tested it in Montanaand from what i remember he had pretty good results...Might be worth talking with your local officals about.
Go to Top of Page

David Lowry

USA
485 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2007 :  1:29:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cliff, I recall JM had said the same thing.

http://www.sleddogcentral.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=279
Go to Top of Page

Cliff Maxfield

USA
2631 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2007 :  3:20:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for posting that. Wayne's post was more in the context of his experiences while trapping wolves.
I believe they both visit this site. Maybe they will chime in and add their thoughts.
Somehow the idea of a bunch of "save the wolf" people standing around filling gallon jugs paints a strange picture.

Edited by - Cliff Maxfield on 11/30/2007 3:23:17 PM
Go to Top of Page

Dana

24 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2007 :  4:35:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The fellow that I got a couple of dogs from had a Rotti and another cross breed that were the protectors of his lot. He had sctually seen them chase off a wolf.
For the livestock around here people also use llamas.

We have a fenced yard and it is amazing how brazen the wildlife can be on coming up to the fence.

Dana
Alberta
Go to Top of Page

northome

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2007 :  6:30:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit northome's Homepage  Reply with Quote
There are some fellas in the southwest that are breeding cold bloods for hunting coyote. these are big tough sight hounds that might have what it takes to protect a dog lot without being a loaded gun to the neighbor kids. We used to have russian wolf hounds. Our wolf hound buddies swore that their bigger ones were more than a match for a wolf if they worked as a team. And, they were great pets and easy to live with. I don't know if dogs of that type could be found, but it think it should be possible.

Al Stead
Northome Siberians

Ann Stead
Northome on Windhill
Go to Top of Page

vetbills

USA
327 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2007 :  9:08:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit vetbills's Homepage  Reply with Quote
We chased two moose out of our yard last night. I felt kind of guilty about being so agressive with them but we realized that while they were looking for a safe place to bed down, the wolves were most likely looking at them as dinner. After many firecrackers we reached a compromise....they hung out at the back end of my neighbor's property, away from the entrance to our dog yard.
Since the dogs who have been killed here in the Fairbanks area are just down the road from us we've been extra diligent in keeping the dog food cooker area clean, emptying its contents with every feeding and keeping the food storage area locked. Our cooker has also been located up near the house instead of in the dogyard. We've also moved our little dogs into the middle of the yard, keeping our 80 plus pounders on the perimeter.
If any of our girls cycle into season, they'll become residents of the house.
We keep the rifle ready and check out every howl or bark in the middle of the night.
Apparently, the next thing I need to do is give my husband plenty of water and go have him write his name in the snow around the yard. That should be entertaining!

"Dammit...I said whoa!"
Out Front! Kennels
Go to Top of Page

Rogue

USA
1158 Posts

Posted - 12/01/2007 :  02:32:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ha ha ha!!! I love that visual, Vetbills!

It's come out that the most recent dog casualty resulted from a woman hitting the dog, either injurying or killing it...then leaving it in the ditch instead of contacting the owners (yes, I agree that the dog should not have been out loose). Of course, the wolves discovered this free meal and had at the neighbor's black lab. This all occurred just down from our house...my hubby's the one who found the eaten carcass. My best friend confirmed this (at least for us) today...on one of her runs, she discovered wolf scat along the trail so she took a sample for Fish & Game. There were lots of black dog-like hairs in there. Well, you do the math.

What we and other neighbors have been doing is leaving the dog yard lights on. In addition to that and in reference to Swanny's post, we have Karelian Bear dogs...these guys have taken on bear and moose (when moose charge us or the dogyard) with ease. We really aren't too worried about wolves in our yard...we'll just leave the Karelians outside in their pen if we have to. No wolf will get anywhere near our yard without our Karelians sounding the alarm. I agree though...the best deterrant is a fenced yard. I'll have to pass the human male urine tip along to my hubby. Maybe Vetbill's husband won't be the only one with a jug of water.

Happy Trails!
Tammi

"The more people I meet, the more I like my dogs."
Go to Top of Page

solo

USA
356 Posts

Posted - 12/01/2007 :  05:13:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Definitely an Anatolian, is a good idea. We had one live to be 16 years. He took a few swats over the years requiring stitches, but he was vigilant and serious about protecting his boundaries, his sled dogs (once he figured out THEY weren't predators, pointy eared critters). He wanted to be outside all of the time, even though he could sleep in the house at any time. He had a bold, bluffing way about him, rocking on his feet, barking when a fox or coyote came in. We had wolf pair roaming here and while we didn't see a confrontation, they never came in close.
We thinks the swats were from bears, but not sure. He , too, did run with the sled dogs in harness. He came to us as a rescue, an adult so we don't know where he came from, but he was well socialized. He held some hunters at bay one year. Never bit a human or a dog . Was a great puppy trainer.
Go to Top of Page

krakenrsh

Canada
313 Posts

Posted - 12/01/2007 :  08:17:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Our dog yard is fenced. Every spring we get a pack of 4-5 wolves crossing Slate River Valley looking for plentiful deer. Problem is that their route crosses through our property and the last several years they meander right by the dog yard. Up to last spring they just caused a stir, last spring I was awaken at 4:00am to the dog yard erupting, when I went outside to check I found 3 wolves trying to dig through the still frozen earth under our perimeter fencing. They have become bolder. I waved my flash light at them and made a bunch of noise, although the dogs were doing enough of that, and they hesitantly walked away, all the while looking over their shoulders. They returned for 4 straight nights, without digging, but gazing at the dogs. They must of eventually killed deer because they never came back. I will await to see what happens this spring.
Go to Top of Page

swanny

USA
869 Posts

Posted - 12/01/2007 :  11:29:32 AM  Show Profile  Visit swanny's Homepage  Reply with Quote
"He had a bold, bluffing way about him, rocking on his feet, barking when a fox or coyote came in."

I understand that is the 'first level' response that Anatolians were selected for and is part of the 'Orient' phase of the whole canine hunting chain (orient - eye or stalk - chase - grab bite - kill bite - dissect - consume). It's really interested to see Seamus 'up on his toes' making a horrible ruckus over a bunny wabbit or something, but he does.

I read that Anatolian Shepherd Dogs have been clocked free running at over 30 miles per hour. My Seamus doesn't have close to that kind of speed, but he's nonetheless a really fun sled dog and a great 'buddy' as well.

Swanny

A good dog is so much a nobler beast than an indifferent man that one sometimes gladly exchanges the society of one for that of the other. William Francis Butler

http://www.tworiversak.com/mushing.htm
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
SDC Talk! © Sled Dog Central Go To Top Of Page
Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.07