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 Tylan dosage?
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trailbound

USA
410 Posts

Posted - 06/22/2004 :  7:14:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Anyone know the reccomended dosage for dogs and also how is it normally administered (in water or on food?)
K

Ami

USA
100 Posts

Posted - 06/22/2004 :  8:29:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit Ami's Homepage  Reply with Quote
1/4 teaspoon per dog per day for 5 days. The only feeding instructions are for livestock, which they say to put it in the drinking water. To be practical, I top-dressed each dog's soaked kibble when I used it.

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trailbound

USA
410 Posts

Posted - 06/23/2004 :  11:09:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Ami...
K

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Mark Black

USA
223 Posts

Posted - 06/23/2004 :  3:53:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What the heck is Tylan?

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trailbound

USA
410 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2004 :  09:23:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tylan Powder is a poultry and swine antibiotic that has shown to be effective in dogs with chronic diahreah (sp?)issues. I believe it is actually effective against certain bacterial infections.
K

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Dr. Jerry Vanek

149 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2004 :  10:30:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Speaking of dosages for tylosin (Tylan), there are actual dosages recommended for dogs. Go on-line and read up. You will find it is somehwere between 10 and 80 milligrams per killogram of body weight per day, sometimes divided into 8- or 12-hour doses. It is irresponsible to give "teaspoons" etc. as one needs to know the concentration of what is being given, especially if it is a hoof-stock preparation from the farm store (see my remarks in the Atguard discussion).

Yes, tylosin (Tylan) does seem to help with the "stress" diarhea in marathon dogs. However, it is imperative that the trail veterinarians know that the dogs are being treated with it!

First of all, tylosin is a close relative of erythromycin. Therefore, it shouldn't be used if the bugs are resistant to the latter. In addition, resistance to erythromycin is easily achieved, so chronic use of tylosin may well pre-select for super bugs, which the musher then will have to face. Tylan is recommended for long-term therapy (up to six weeks), but that is under the supervision of a veterinarian who is running tests and following the progress of the disease.

Second, because erythromycin competes for ribosomal sites with clindamycin (Antirobe), if a marathon dog contracts a serious foot infection, the trail veterinians won't be able to treat the dog with Antirobe.

Third, erythromycin is bacteriostatic and, although the jury is out on this subject with regard to tylosin, to be safe, it should not be used with any penicillin product. Thus, a trail veterinarian is again hamstrung if a dog gets in a serious fight, etc., requiring antibiotic therapy.

Like all drugs, tylosin has benefits for marathon dogs plagued with diarrhea in race mode; but, it is not a magic bullet and the musher must understand the risk/benefit ratio and know what they're doing and why.

It is best to sit down with your kennel veterinarian and discuss the pros and cons of chronic antibiotic therapy.

Mush on....

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Ami

USA
100 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2004 :  12:12:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Ami's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dr. Vanek, do you think there is a need to treat all the dogs annually with Tylan? The Bush Vet, Dr. Eric Jayne, is pretty high on the stuff and has been recommending we do this.

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Dr. Jerry Vanek

149 Posts

Posted - 06/26/2004 :  08:27:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ami,
Again, I think each musher should sit down with their own veterinarian and discuss the relative merits of doing anything, as it is that musher and veterinarian team who will have to face whatever positive or negative results might ocurr.
I can't make a blanket statement about "all dogs." But, I can make blanket statements about a particular de-wormer or antibiotic, based on USDA or FDA information, where I'm acting as a conduit of information. But, medicine is not a science. It is an art based on scientific principles. Therefore, where the rubber meets the road, ultimately, the individual musher and his or her veterinarian have to put their heads together and ask, "Is this the most appropriate direction for me to take?"
Mushing is life. And, like life, the successful musher belongs to no particular political party or religion or camp, but reads and listens and watches everything intently, weighing and sifting and then applying what appears to be the best tactic to his or her own lifestyle, geography, talents, and goals and aspirations. If things work out, keep doing it. If things fail, rethink it and try something else.
I've been involved with sled dogs since the 1960s, and the one predictable flaw in the mushing community over all those years is the tendancy to jump on one lemming-filled bandwagon after another and race headlong towards the nearest cliff. And this in a sub-population of the most independent and individualistic people I've ever known! That is a paradox I've never been able to reconcile.
I would never recommend that "all dogs" receive anything, except water, and even the amount of that will vary per the individual dog.
Happy Unique and Individual Trails!

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Ami

USA
100 Posts

Posted - 06/26/2004 :  11:54:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit Ami's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the reply. Vets are some of the most independent and individualistic people I've ever known!...each with their own strengths and experiences. I appreciate the knowledge you bring to this forum, and the time it takes to do so.

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Dr. Jerry Vanek

149 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2004 :  09:05:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ami, you couldn't be more right. And, that's about all I've got to say about Tylan. I'm heading back to the worm factory.

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trailbound

USA
410 Posts

Posted - 06/28/2004 :  2:47:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I did as through a search as my search engine is capable before I posted on this forum, and was totally unable to find dosages for dogs anywhere (hence this post here) I have sprint dogs, and it is far from race season now, so i am not too concerned about having to treat for other things etc etc...The Tylan i have is Equivalent to 100 g tylosin base, and being unfamiliar (totally) with metric volume measurements, I am going to need something non metric (like teaspoons). Can anyone help?
Kelley

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Opossum

210 Posts

Posted - 06/30/2004 :  10:10:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The metric system is plain and simple, don't be afraid of it... (there is a reason why we have 10 fingers!)
A teaspoon is an equivalent of 5 mL when dealing with liquids, which is the same as 5 cc. There are 1000 mL in a liter (L). If you were to dissolve the jar (100 g) of Tylan in 1 L of water, you will have a 100g/L concentration, which is equivalent to a 100 mg/mL concentration (100g = 100,000mg). Now let's say you choose to use 50 mg /kg (just an example, I am not making recommendations as far as the dosage). Let's take a 50 lb dog (22.7 kg). His dose would be 1,135 mg (22.7 x 50). Divided by 100 mg (concentration 100 mg/mL) it comes to 11.35 mL . This is an equivalent of a little over 2 teaspoons of the liquid concentrate.

NOW SOMEONE PLEASE CORRECT ME IF I AM MESSING UP!

Having said all that, the 1/4 teaspoon dry powder dosage is a recommendation of Dr. Eric Jayne. To find out how many mgs that is you would pretty much have to weigh it... I assume it is an empirical dose he is recommending.

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trailbound

USA
410 Posts

Posted - 06/30/2004 :  11:58:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Opossum,
That is exactly the information iw as hoping someone could help me out with...
kelley

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Opossum

210 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2004 :  6:34:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Addendum:
The Plumb Veterinary Drug Handbook lists the Tylan powder strength at approximately 4,000 mg per teaspoon.

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