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DogBreath

USA
33 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2009 :  10:29:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ditto on the eye removal. Have a 8 year old seppala that had the same problem. Opthamologist messed around with meds and he ended up having a reaction and seizures to those. Once it was diagnosed I should have just removed the eye straight away. Glaucoma can happen quickly and it doesn't take much to permanently damage the optic nerve, once that's done no medication can reverse it.

The dog is now on phenobarbital to control the seizures but I regret messing around with the meds instead of just removing the eye once I knew what it was. I could have saved the poor guy from the pain of the glaucoma by acting quicker instead of trying to save an eye that was already gone.

He's a great happy house pet now.
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solo

USA
352 Posts

Posted - 12/04/2009 :  05:52:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
He was just in for check again yesterday. Pressure has gone down to 34 (from 60's), but I passed on your experiences here. Our veterinarian is consulting with an opthamologist (yesterday)and it seems we would proceed to enucleation. He is expressing some relief, happy to run, eating better, etc. Thank you!
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solo

USA
352 Posts

Posted - 12/16/2009 :  04:49:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Update: Our dog will go to the ophthamologist tomorrow for a chemical oblation of the eye... will let you know how it resolves.
Dr recommends it over enucleation . We are still treating with Xalatan, now in both eyes (1x a day in good eye, 2x a day in painful eye). His spirits are much better on the Xalatan. Thanks for all of your help.
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Susie Rogan

Canada
1001 Posts

Posted - 12/16/2009 :  11:04:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good luck at the vet, I hope it goes well and trust it will.
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solo

USA
352 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2009 :  06:14:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hopefully this is the last update, but our dog is doing very well.
Under general anesthesia he had two chemicals inserted into the body in the eye that produces fluid, to 'kill' the fluid production. (hope I am saying this accuratately, someone correct me... chemical ablation)
Post surgery his eye has reduced to original size, he is not exhibiting sign of pain and his appetite is great again. The Dr said to tell this lead dog that he is 'on vacation' (restricted activity). He is looking to want to leap about, so short leash for awhile. He is on eye drops for one month and then recheck. They also prescribed an emergency kit, should the other eye flare up.
Also, there is a one in 25 dog chance that he may need a 2nd injection, we will be watching! Thanks all!
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Susie Rogan

Canada
1001 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2009 :  2:04:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Interesting solution to the problem! I am going to pass this on to a friend who just had her dog get glaucoma in the second eye. She had the first eye removed a year and a half ago, now he's got it in the other one. She does not want to put the dog down even though he is blind. Says he's still happy and getting around fine, but she has to do something about that eye.

Thank you for taking the time to share your experience, it is helpful for other people to see alternatives they have not heard of.
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solo

USA
352 Posts

Posted - 12/20/2009 :  05:49:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hope she can get some quick help for her dog... the emergency kit
is for the good eye but I don't know if it requires previous ablation in the other eye. Her vet might know or could call an animal eye specialist.
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solo

USA
352 Posts

Posted - 01/04/2010 :  5:15:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just to update: our dog treated with chemical ablation is doing well. His treated eye has become about normal size, tends to red at times, but he receives antibiotic drops twice a day (for a few more days, one month protocol). His good eye is doing well, to date. We have the emergency kit which is actually two sets of pills to use, should the good eye show signs of glaucoma (red, swollen). His spirits are great, so far, so good! From this experience seems like it's worth it, before considering enucleation. If anything changes, we will post.
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Susie Rogan

Canada
1001 Posts

Posted - 01/04/2010 :  8:33:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Solo, I just sent you an email to try to get info on this procedure to share with our veterinarians up here. I do not believe they are at all aware of the option. They have tried 6 different drops with my friend so far, and are trying to avoid removing the eye but that seems to be the next step.

Specifically, we'd like your vet to talk to the vet up here to give him some direction, some idea of where to look to get the chemicals etc.

The vet here has actually phoned around to other clinics to get ideas, so he is open to ideas.

Thanks, Susie
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C. Savagian

USA
57 Posts

Posted - 01/05/2010 :  07:11:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Intravitreal gentamycin injection (chemical ablation of the eye) is discussed in most veterinary schools, so your vet should be aware of it.... It is good to think of all options but please listen to your vet carefully when discussing pros and cons of this one. That is the largest toe I'll stick into these murky waters.
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solo

USA
352 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2010 :  5:26:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Update, today his pressure measured '3' in the eye with ablation
(ablation in mid December). He's doing well. Other eye normal/good pressure as well.
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RunAmok

USA
149 Posts

Posted - 02/11/2010 :  2:05:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Intravitreal gentamicin works very well and is a very reasonable alternative to surgical enucleation. Our Rottweiler had Stage V lymphoma which initially presented as unilateral glaucoma. Because he did not like needles, drops etc. After a single treatment with L-asparaginase (chemotherapy) to initially reduce his tumor burden as a palliative measure, we elected to treat the lymphoma conservatively with oral steroids alone rather than with chemotherapy since with Stage V lymphoma the prognosis is poor with or without chemotherapy. Initially, the glaucoma resolved, but when it returned, he was otherwise happy and active and the only limit to his quality of life was his eye. We chose intravitreal gentamicin as a first choice over surgical enucleation because it was less invasive, and if successful, it would avoid a surgical procedure. It worked wonderfully and he did as well as could be expected and ultimately survive 5.5 months from the date of his initial diagnosis with lymphoma with no recurrence of the glaucoma. His eye just shrunk down to nothing.

I don't know if he did not have a life-threatening illness whether the intravitreal gentamicin treatment would be as durable over the long term as a surgical enucleation, but for our circumstance, it was a perfect solution. Also, for the result that we observed, his eye really shrunk down completely and with the resulting scarring that I am certain would have occurred, I would have found it very difficult to imagine a recurrence in his treated eye had the underlying illness permitted a longer follow up.

It really works out very well. It generally needs to be done by a veterinary ophthalmologist, where a surgical enucleation might be something that a general veterinary surgeon might be able to offer if there is no veterinary ophthalmologist in your area. But otherwise, I think it is a good alternative.

Chris Michaeles
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solo

USA
352 Posts

Posted - 04/12/2010 :  5:35:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Happy update!! If you look at the main page of Sled Dog Central
today (4.12.2010) you'll see Skinny, the dog who had the chemical ablation for glaucoma... happily pulling his little friend on a trail ride... no pain and fully functioning. He continues to do very very well.
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